You have a meeting scheduled with a potentially big donor and you want to know what level of funding should you ask from this philanthropist? Since fundraising is built on the emotional connection the donor has to your cause, knowing the ‘why’ of what gets your donors to give will be the basis for your successful fundraising ask.

Hope Consulting’s groundbreaking study identifies six ‘donor giving drives’ in philanthropy. When giving to an organization, donors are motivated by one of these six drives. When you can successfully identify which one of these factors motivates each of your donors, your requests will resonate with them much more to succeed at gaining their support.

When it comes to getting new donors, knowing which factors drive them will save you time and allow you to focus your efforts effectively. Which means, IY’H you will raise more funds with less wasted effort.

The six ‘donor giving drives’ are the:

  1. ‘REPAYER’ GIVER
  2. ‘SEE THE DIFFERENCE’ GIVER
  3. ‘RESULTS’ GIVER
  4. ‘HASHKAFIC’ GIVER
  5. ‘PERSONAL TIES’ GIVER
  6. ‘CASUAL’ GIVER

1.THE ‘REPAYER’ GIVER

Gives because your organization has impacted his life or the life of a loved one.

You can identify them when they say:

“They are my top priority in tzedakah, they were mekarev me.”

“If it wasn’t because of this organization, I don’t where my grandson would be today, they deserve my support!”

2. ‘SEE THE DIFFERENCE’ GIVER

Gives because he sees or feels that their donation makes a clear difference or that without their support the project would not have gotten off the ground. For example, a donor who offers a challenge grant, who funds a scholarship to send a student to Israel or who gives to a specific project rather than a general donation.

You can identify them when they say:

“I only give to smaller organizations where I feel I can make a difference.”

“I give to specific projects where I see my support is needed.”

3. ‘RESULTS’ GIVER

Gives because your organization can show how it is generating measurable outcomes in its segment of the Jewish world.

You can identify them when they say:

“I give to the organizations that can show clear measurable outcomes.”

“I give to projects where they have a matrix mapped out for moving people in their Jewish observance.”

4. CASUAL GIVER

Gives because he is asked. Most, if not all, of their gifts are on the smaller and medium size.

You can identify them when they say:

“I primarily give to well known Jewish organizations, when they send out a mailing.”

“I donated $360 for their Chinese auction.”

5. ‘HASHKAFA BASED’ GIVER

Gives because your organization is part of his hashkafa or religious group.

You can identify them when they say:

“We give to our shul and yeshiva.”

“I support yeshivas; kiruv is important, but my priority is to support our own mosdos.”

“I support Chabad mosdos.”

 

6. ‘PERSONAL TIES’ GIVER

Gives because of the personal connection he has to the cause.

You can identify them when they say:

“I’ve been learning with the rabbi for a year, he has a great project which I support”

“My brother has a kiruv project which I give a large portion of my support tzedakah to.”

—————————

If you want to apply this model to enhance your fundraising efforts, answer the following questions:  

  • Which one of the six drives most represents each of your top donors?
  • Which one of the six donor drives is the best fit for your organization given its strengths?
  • How should you alter the way you reach out to your donors knowing their drives?
  • How will understanding your supporters’ drives help you find more donors?

Email me to share your insights or your questions or any ideas for future fundraising blogs at avrahamlewis@gmail.com

 

_________________________________________

Avraham Lewis, fundraising consultant and Charidy.com fundraising specialist, guides Torah organizations to effectively raise more funds. Take a look how he has helped mosdos Torah raise more at www.avrahamlewis.com

 

 

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