The need for continuous and inspired parent-child dialogue is about as deep a Jewish value as you will find. For millennia, we have used such communication as a means of inculcating within our offspring a deep sense of religious connection and understanding, while also keeping them focused on proper behaviors and values. In

Time Magazine’s 2017 Person of the Year were “the silence breakers, the voices that launched a movement.”  That movement, well known by its hashtag, #MeToo, continues to hold accountable violators of abuse and exploitation. The movement is several months old and shows no signs of slowing. Just last week, a South

As we move away from Parshas Parah and HaChodesh, we are reminded of the fact that our Sages inform us that of all the laws of the Torah, the only one King Solomon – the wisest of all men – could not comprehend was Parah Adumah (the Red Heifer). Our Sages inform us that the part he could not understand was how can the

The Torah understanding is that Hashem not only created the world – something – from absolutely nothing, but that He continually sustains and supervises it. And not only does He supervise the big events in the world, He also supervises the details in all of our lives. This naturally leads to a classical question which has been discussed throughout the generations –

It’s a central part of far too many organizations. Bickering. The lack of healthy communication. Folks sitting quietly at their desks, hoping to stay under the radar and not be burdened with more work, let alone someone else’s work. People prioritizing their wants and needs over those of the team, or those of their own team over the organization as a whole.

For millions of people worldwide, the act of taking selfies has become an integral part of the social media experience. Selfies are internationally pervasive and evoke strong reactions from those who encounter them. In a hysterical clip about selfies, comedian Sebastian Maniscalco hits hard on selfie takers. In his words, the act of taking a selfie should
Imagine a State of the Union address that – instead of measuring progress relative to the promises made during the most recent election campaign – used the yardstick of the values and goals articulated in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.  Such an exercise would certainly provide a deeper and broader